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Conference Programs & Schedule 42nd Annual Conference & Convocation ACCA National Management Conference

ACOA 8th Annual National Symposium

Atlanta, Georgia

November 4-6, 1999

Wednesday, November 3, 1999

7:30am-8:00am Registration & Hospitality (Registration A&B)

12:30-1:00pm

6:00-7:30pm

8:00 – 12:00pm

Complex Change and Innovation in Healthcare Institutions: A Path for Shaping the Future

(Ballroom 1&2) (a 4-hour Executive Management Education Course offered by The Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California

Lee Edwards, DEd

, Visiting Assistant Professor, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California

The oxymoron is that change is a constant! Organizations are ever evolving, metamorphosing into something new or different from that which we have known. Change and innovation provides the opportunity to shape the future of health care in many ways. It is essential that leaders, managers, and, realistically, all health providers have a basic understanding and potential for leading change. The session will cover the process of change, as well as the “dark side” of change efforts. As such, the session will cover the following areas:

Recognizing of the types, states, and psychological aspects of change

  • Methods of diagnosing health care institutions from a systems perspective.
  • Deciding what needs to be changed, readiness and the ability to proactively embrace change
  • Communicating the need for change to gain allies and support
  • Establishing an incentive system for change accomplishments
  • Identifying change agents and their roles
  • Identifying leverage points for change to occur
  • Developing a model for transition to manage the change process
  • Anticipating and developing strategies to deal with resistance
  • Dealing with the political realities of change
  • Evaluating change effort and results

1:00 – 5:00pm

Leadership and Design Skills for Teams in Healthcare: Building Teams for Success!

(Ballroom I & II) (a 4-hour Executive Management Education Course offered by The Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California)

Lee Edwards, DEd

, Visiting Assistant Professor, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California

The use of teams in health care is especially important toward accomplishing the hospital, clinic, treatment facility, or clinic’s established goals. In the administrative arena the use teams is paramount to achieve important changes, resolve problems, or to proactively gain enhanced effectiveness in functional areas. Hospital leaders and administrators must demonstrate knowledge and potential competency in team dynamics. As such, the session will cover the following areas:

As a designer of teams or as a leader:

  • Identifying various types of teams and their use
  • Selecting technical and non-technical professional team members
  • Defining team purpose, objective(s), task(s), and parameters.
  • Providing resources and authority for mission accomplishment
  • Building commitment of team members
  • Establishing roles and responsibilities for members
  • Fostering sensitivity and respect to other’s agendas and status
  • Understanding leadership styles in teams
  • Understanding member’s roles in teams
  • Keeping the team motivated
  • Assessing team processes and performance
  • Developing a high-performance team
  • 7:00-8:30pm Federal Council Reception with Dignitaries

    (Rondelet)

    Thursday, November 4, 1999

    7:00-5:00pm Registration & Hospitality (Registration A&B)

    6:00-7:30pm

    8:00-10:00am ACOA Board of Directors Meeting

    (Stately)

    7:45-5:00pm 1999 Federal Day

    (Ballroom I & II)

    7:45-8:00am Posting of Colors

    Welcome & Opening

    Janice B. Babcock, FAAMA, Federal Director

    Gary P. Riedmann, FAAMA, Chairman of the Board

    8:00-8:45am

    1999 Federal Day Keynote Presentation(Invited Guest)

    LtGen Charles H. Roadman II, USAF, MC

    , Air Force Surgeon General, Bolling Air Force Base, Washington, DC

    9:00-11:00am Federal Panel Presentation

    Federal Sector Partnering for Greater Efficiency with Other Federal Agencies and the Private Sector

    RADM Joseph Phillip Van Landingham

    , Chief, Medical Service Corps, United States Navy, Navy Bureau of Medicine & Surgery, Washington, DC

    US Air Force (To be determined)

    Department of VA (To be determined)

    US Army (To be determined)

    10:00-12:00pm ACCA Board of Directors Meeting (Rondelet)

    2:00-5:00pmAAMA Board of Directors & Foundation Board Meetings

    (Ascot)

    12:00-1:30pm Federal Luncheon

    (Habersham)

    Keynote Presentation – Colonel Allen W. Middleton, USAF, MSC, CAAMA, Director, Medical Programs & Resources, Surgeon General’s Office, Bolling Air Force Base, DC

    1:45-3:45pm

    How to Move Into Your Next Career Successfully (Ballroom 1&2)

    Bill Karlson

    , Speaker, Author, Host, WCA, LLC, CEO. Successful international executive recruiter. Career and job transition coach. Brentwood, Tennessee ü Negotiating skills you need
    ü Strategic networking
    ü Clarify career options
    ü Who are you; how to package yourself for success
    ü How to communicate that you “can make a difference”
    ü Bringing it all to closure

    Sooner or later everyone will be faced with job change…so why not prepare now. With subtle humor and a down-to-earth approach, Bill Karlson will show you how to ignite your passion, follow your dreams and get on course to the greatest job of your life. Discover the career that turns you on. Find the job of your dreams with your choice of employers. Learn to write resumes that make interviews happen and to avoid the three answers that kill job offers. Get top starting pay while never giving an amount. Turn a job reference into your personal sales agent. Learn Bill’s secrets by attending this powerful session.

    2:00 – 5:00pm

    Internet 101: The Basics of Incorporating the World Wide Web Into Everyday Practice

    (Ballroom III & IV)

    Sponsored by Ortho Biotech, Inc.

    Bill Felkey

    , Associate Professor, Pharmacy Care Systems, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama

    After participating in this session, attendees will be able to:

    ü

    Understand basic browser functions such as navigation, searching, bookmarks, source validity, email, and getting connected

    ü

    Discuss the information processing technologies available to caregivers on the Internet

    ü

    Evaluate at least three Internet resources for adoption to practice

    ü

    Identify at least one Internet resource for immediate use to support the provision of patient-focused services

    Are you re ready for a Practice that is Heavily Supported by the Internet? Here is the good and bad news:

    ü

    All of the technology pieces needed to be more efficient and effective exist right now (all of them)

    ü

    The software, hardware, and the Internet is affordable and easy to use

    ü

    The “pieces of the technology puzzle” are not yet integrated into a single system anywhere

    ü

    Several systems and vendors are attempting the integration

    ü

    Much can be done while we are waiting for the perfect solution

    This highly interactive session will amaze, inform, entertain, and overwhelm you with the wealth of resources that are available t you to extend your professional efficiency and effectiveness

    Internet 107: Building an Oncology Practice Website That Communicates

    (Ballroom III & IV)

    Sponsored by Ortho Biotech, Inc.

    Bill Felkey

    , Associate Professor, Pharmacy Care Systems, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama

    After participating in the session, the attendess will be able to:

    ü

    Understand at least three methods for creating and managing effective Web pages

    ü

    Describe at least three innovative multimedia capabilities offered by Web technology

    ü

    Delineate the qualities of Best Practice Oncology Websites that are key success factors for your organization’s Web initiative

    ü

    Discuss trends and opportunities for a successful use of the World Wide Web in their oncology practice

    ü

    Calculating the return on investment for creating and maintaining a presence on the World Wide Web can be challenging. Budgets ranging from $10,000 to $2 million mst be established as a cost of entry., Consideration for using alternative advertising to bring people to your Web offerings must be examined. Administrative savings through E-commerce of 10-15% are being realized. This session will help you understand this technology’s role in patient care delivery and education.

    2:00-5:00pm

    Developing a Stem Cell Program in a Community Hospital

    ( Galleria) ? )

    Phyllis DeAntonio, RN, MSN, OCN

    , Administrator, Leo W. Jenkins Cancer Center, University Health Systems of Eastern Carolina, Greenville, North Carolina

    Joseph M. Spallina, FAAMA, FACHE

    , Director, Arvina Group, LLC, Ann Arbor, Michigan

    This session will focus on:

    ü

    Determining the scope of services and key operational components for a stem cell program in a community hospital, including hospital-based services and role and medical oncology practice-based services and relationship to the hospital role.

    ü

    Reviewing the essential steps and key components of the planning process

    ü

    Detailing a budget and the budgeting process for the program

    ü

    Identifying routine information and data requirements to support the program and effective program management

    4:00-5:00pm

    Federal Breakout Sessions

    5:00-6:00pm AAMA Editorial Board Meeting (Etalage)

    6:00-7:30pm Welcome Reception

    (Garden Court)

    Friday, November 5, 1999

    6:30-8:00am Navy Fun Run

    7:00-7:30pm Registration & Hospitality (Registration A&B)

    7:00-6:00pmExhibits

    (Garden Court)

    7:00-8:00am

    Continental Breakfast(Garden Court)

    8:00-8:45amAAMA General Membership Meeting

    (Ballroom III & IV)

    8:45-9:45amOpening Keynote Presentation

    (Ballroom III & IV)

    The Leaders Journey: Achieving Excellence in the Midst of Constant Change

    Sponsored by Modern Healthcare

    Terry L. Paulson, PhD, CSP, CPAE, Paulson & Associates, Inc., Agoura Hills, California

    No one can risk resting in past successes in today’s constantly changing healthcare industry. The increased demands for service, quality care, and cost containment produce a difficult challenge for even the best leaders. This inspirational keynote will help you learn practical leadership strategies you can use immediately on your journey to leadership excellence. Learn how to sustain team morale and productivity while still affirming the organization’s core values and business strategy. Explore how to manage accountability and support; how to be tight where you can and loose where it counts; and how to use resistance while still generating enthusiasm for strategic change.

    9:45 – 10:45amBreak/Exhibits

    (Garden Court)

    10:45 – 11:45amKeynote Presentation

    (Ballroom III & IV)

    Heart Replacement: A Promise for the Future and the Power of Teamwork

    William S. Pierce, MD

    , Emeritus, Director, Surgical Research, Evan Pugh Professor of Surgery & Jane A. Fetter, Professor of Surgery, Associate Chair, Department of Surgery, Penn State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania

    The thought of replacing a human heart with a totally artificial device was at one time complete science fiction. As the world sits on the verge of a new millennium, the science fiction of total heart replacement continues to become more of a reality. In fact, a new era of heart assist devices has begun as newer devices are designed for long-term performance. The primary driving forces behind the development of such devices are the general shortage of human donors hearts and the vast improvements of patient care related technology allowing for smaller, more manageable devices. However, none of the advances that have been made to date or none of the advances that will continue to be made would be possible without vast amounts of teamwork and perseverance. The advances in heart assistance are truly remarkable, no doubt. The importance of the teamwork that has made the advances possible is truly legendary.

    11:45-12:15pm Advancement Seminar

    (Waverly)

    11:45-12:45pm Diplomates in Healthcare Administration Luncheon Meeting

    (Ascot)

    11:45-1:00pm ACCA Luncheon

    (Atrium Lobby)

    Luncheon Keynote Presentation –

    Cardiovascular Medicine in the 21st Century – Issues and Opportunities

    Keynote Speaker: Christine W. McEntee, Executive Vice President, American College of Cardiology, Bethesda, Maryland

    The emergence of the 21st century holds great promise for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Come learn how cardiovascular specialists, through their professional society, the American College of Cardiology, view issues in the new millennium and how they are planning to address them.

    11:45-1:00pm ACOA Luncheon and Membership Meeting

    (Habersham)

    12:30-1:00pm Convocation Rehearsal

    (Kennesaw)

    12:30-1:00pm Welcome to the American College of Contingency Planners

    (Waverly)

    LCDR Pietro D. Marghella, MSC, USN

    , Chief of Medical Plans and Programs, Commander-in-Chief, United States Pacific Command, President and Co-Founder, ACCP,

    Friday Afternoon Breakout Tracks

    General

    (Wilton)

    1:00-2:00pm

    Healthcare’s Top 10 Trends That Should Ride Into Next Decade

    Lou Pavia

    , Executive Vice President, McManis Associates, Inc., Washington, DC

    This presentation will discuss sophisticated and empowered consumers; organized physicians; new models of physician/hospital integration; healthcare finance companies; comprehensive health systems and niche players; e-care; hospitals as critical care centers; drugs and medical technology; and evidence based medicine.

    2:10-3:10pm

    Gainsharing Programs: Partnerships for the Future

    Craig E. Holm, CHE, CHC

    , Director, Health Strategies & Solutions, Inc., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

    Scott Godshall

    , Esquire, Partner, Pepper Hamilton & Scheetz, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

    Participants will:

    ü

    Learn how to define gainsharing program objectives

    ü

    Gain an understanding of the process for developing a gainsharing program and associated legal issues

    ü

    Learn how to measure program success

    3:10-4:10pmBreak/Exhibits

    (Garden Court)

    4:10-5:10pm

    The Balanced Scorecard: Linking Vision, Strategy and Performance

    Donna Foth-Collins

    , Principal, Accelerated Business Strategies, Renton, Washington

    The Balanced Scorecard provides a framework for directly linking vision and strategy by developing measures and targets that drive performance and focus the entire organization’s efforts from top to bottom. This session will provide an overview of the Balance Scorecard, including a practical four step approach for building a balanced scorecard, examples of scorecards from other organizations and key strategies for assuring a successful implementation.

    Leadership

    (Brayton)

    1:00-2:00pm

    Achieving and Maintaining Professional Excellence: A Question of Balance and Proper Assessment

    Sponsored by Guidant Corporation

    Daniel J. West, Jr., PhD, FAAMA, FACHE, FACMPE

    , Associate Professor, Graduate MHA Program, University of Scranton, Pennsylvania

    Participants, as a result of attending this session, will be able to:

    • Assess their professional needs accurately
    • Identify adaptive responses to enhance relationships
    • Identify functional skill sets
    • Eliminate malproductive behaviors
    • Design paradigms that energize people and synergize relationships
    • Implement strategies that facilitate change and maintain excellence
    • Understand human motivation and the need to succeed
    • Consider developing an armamentarium of coping skills

    2:10-3:10pmContinued from above

    3:10-4:10pm Break/Exhibits

    (Garden Court)

    4:10-5:10pm

    At Last! A Scientific Method for Measuring and Improving Leadership Effectiveness in Healthcare Organizations

    Sponsored by Guidant Corporation

    Richard L. Supples

    , President, Applied Improvement Technologies, South Windsor, Connecticut

    Dr. Robert F. Bales, professor of social relations at Harvard University, has now provided healthcare leaders with a new set of practical tools that enable them to simultaneously define, assess, measure, and improve leadership and team effectiveness. A demonstration of this method called SYMLOG (Systematic Multiple-level Observation of Groups) and key research findings from healthcare settings will be presented. Unlike other instruments, this method provides a benchmark for excellence using the “business research normative profile” and identifies areas of strength and needed improvement. The key topics covered in this presentation are:

    3

    Dr. R.F. Bales= research on the most effective leader and team for healthcare organizations

    3

    An overview of SYMLOG theory and practical methods – how the system works

    3

    The business research normative profile

    3

    How SYMLOG provides a structured and comprehensive basis for improving leadership competency

    3

    Applications: Who uses SYMLOG and how

    Managed Care

    (Chancellor)

    1:00-2:00pm

    How to Merge the Clinical and Financial Aspects of Healthcare to Create a Successful Environment

    Laurie B. Bajich, PT

    , Administrator/Chief Executive Officer, Health South Rehabilitation Hospital of Austin, Texas

    How do you bridge the ever-present conflicts between the clinical “side of the house” and the financial “side of the house?” Financial officers want profit maximized. Clinicians want patients to receive as much care as they “deserve” regardless of the reimbursement parameters. Neither one of these extreme approaches to care has proven to be successful. This presentation will focus on the mechanisms for blending these two, often opposing, “sides of the house” to ensure quality outcomes in a cost-effective environment. The speaker will give specific insight on effective strategies used by administrators to bridge this gap and create a successful operation.

    2:10-3:10pm

    Medicare Demystified

    Maj A. Adolphe Edward, MSC, CFAAMA

    , Sr. Care Fellow, Course Supervisor/Health Services Administrator, Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas

    This session will address healthcare operations under Medicare guidelines. With the implementation of Medicare+Choice resulting from the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 many operational changes are required to meet HCFA guidelines. Understanding these operational guidelines is a key to being a successful provider of Medicare.

    3:10-4:10pmExhibits/Break

    4:10-5:10pm

    Measuring Physician Performance: A Case Study in Provider Profiling

    Maj Barry Evans, PhD, MSC, USAF

    , Assistant Professor, Baylor Graduate Program in Health Care Administration, Center for Healthcare Education and Studies, Fort Sam Houston, Texas

    This session will include an overview of the complex issues involved in measuring physician performance. The bulk of the session will be a discussion of a research project to measure physician performance at a large military medical center. The project examined various outcome measures of normal vaginal births and created statistical measures to evaluate provider performance. Participants will leave with an understanding of how to set up a effective and physician-supported provider profiling measures at their own facilities.

    Contingency Planning

    (Waverly)

    1:00-2:00pm

    The Role of the Professional Contingency Planner in Support of Domestic Terrorism Employing Weapons of Mass Destruction

    RADM Michael Cowen, MC, USN

    , Deputy Director for Medical Readiness, J4-Medical Readiness Division, the Joint Staff, Washington, DC

    The professional disaster, emergency, and contingency planner represents the vital link in ensuring an optimum level of national preparedness as the threat of terroristic employment of weapons of mass destruction substantially increases. Dr. Cowen will review the roles of these professionals and the multi-faceted responsibilities they maintain as they support their agencies in countering the WMD threat.

    2:10-3:10pm

    The Federal Civilian Health and Medical Response to Weapons of Mass Destruction

    CDR Kevin Tonat, USPHS

    , Office of Emergency Preparedness, National Disaster Medical System, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland

    In the event of a domestic incident involving weapons of mass destruction, the adequacy of medical support will largely hinge upon the activation of National Disaster Medical System assets to support largescale casualty streams. This brief will focus on the federal response plans to provide medical support utilizing civilian healthcare agencies under the direction of OEP.

    3:10-3:30pmBreak/Exhibit

    (Garden Court)

    3:30-4:30pm

    Preparing for Chem-Bio Terrorism: A Local Perspective

    Jerome Hauer

    , Director, The Mayor’s Office of Emergency Management, The City of New York, New York

    The City of New York has taken aggressive steps to prepare for terroristic events involving the employment of chemical or biological weapons of mass destruction. Mr. Hauer’s presentation will discuss how one major metropolitan community is coming to grips with the requirements of consequence management in the face of this burgeoning threat.

    4:40-5:40pm

    Department of Defense Medical Response Capabilities to Weapons of Mass Destruction Events

    COL Craig Llewllyen, MC, USA (Ret),

    Professor and Chair of Military Medicine, The Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland

    The Department of Defense will play a critical role in providing adjunct support to a domestic population effected by a WMD event. Additionally, the DoD represents a high degree of collective expertise in counter-proliferation and consequence management efforts. Dr. Llewllyen’s presentation will focus on the significant capabilities of the military to support the national response network.

    Cardiology

    Women’s Cardiovascular Disease(Ballroom I)

    1:00 – 2:00pm

    Men and Women: What’s So Different When It Comes to Cardiovascular Disease?

    Sponsored by DuPont Pharmaceuticals Company

    Deborah R. Judelson, MD

    , Project Leader, American Medical Women=s Association Education Project on Coronary Heart Disease in Woman, Cardiovascular Medical Group of Southern California, Beverly Hills, California

    At the conclusion of this lecture, participants should have an understanding of the differences in coronary disease between men and women and the medical issues regarding women and CAD by covering the:

    • Review of coronary heart disease risk factors for men and women
    • Risk factors – modifiable and unmodifiable
    • Role of hormones and hormone replacement therapy
    • Symptoms and treatment issues for women
    • Diagnostic testing to enhance the evaluation of coronary heart disease and risk stratification

    2:10 – 3:10pm

    Designing a Women’s Heart Clinic

    Sponsored by Medtronic, Inc.

    Sharonne N. Hayes, MD, FACC

    , Cardiovascular Disease and Internal Medicine, Mayo Medical Center, Rochester, Minnesota

    This presentation will discuss:

    ü

    The Clinic design, which is to optimize delivery of cardiovascular care to women while meeting clinical and institutional demands and priorities

    ü

    The process of developing the concept for the Clinic

    ü

    Gaining consensus and “buy in” by colleagues and the Mayo Clinic

    ü

    Implementation of the plan

    ü

    Unique clinical practice features

    3:10 – 4:10pmBreak/Exhibits

    (Garden Court)

    4:10 – 5:10pm

    Developing Referral Relationships with Primary Care Physicians

    Sponsored by Medtronic, Inc

    Diane Petersen, MD,

    Women’s Health Consultants, Minneapolis, Minnesota

    Charlie Petersen, MD,

    Edina Medical Clinic, Edina, Minnesota

    M. Bridgett Duffy, MD,

    Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota

    This panel presentation will discuss the following issues:

    ü

    Are women’s cardiovascular heart centers the answer for meeting the unmet cardiovascular needs of women

    ü

    The barriers that prevent female patients from receiving the cardiovascular care that they need

    ü

    The relationship between the referring physician and the cardiovascular specialist

    ü

    How to establish appropriate treatment and referral guidelines for the cardiovascular needs of women

    ü

    What is an integrated approach for women’s cardiovascular disease

    ü

    What is the model for cardiovascular care in the next century

    Cardiology

    CV Centers in the 21st Century(Ballroom II)

    1:00 – 2:00pm

    Cardiovascular Programs Beyond 2000 – Does Your Program Have the Right Parts?

    Kevin J. Nowak, Lrd

    , Executive Director, Cardiovascular Services, Rochester General Hospital, Rochester, New York

    Integrated delivery system, comprehensive continuum of care, cardiovascular focused care, etc. Each of these terms is utilized with great frequency in describing cardiovascular programs across the country, but do these descriptions really have meaning. As we move into the next century and begin to ponder the future of healthcare, the real question that must be asked regarding the future of cardiovascular programs is one related to what are the right components of a program that will truly enable the creation of healthcare value. This session will present a new model for assessing cardiovascular programs and the “parts” therein. Additionally, participants will gain an understanding of the internal integration of the respective “parts” and their necessity in future success.

    2:10 – 3:10pm

    Using a Joint Venture Heart Institute to Align Hospital and Physician Expectations…Four Years of Experience

    James P. Zito

    , Executive Director, Prairie Heart Institute, St Johns Hospital, Springfield, Illinois

    This presentation will look at the first four years experience of a joint venture heart institute between a hospital and cardiologists. Reasons for and methods of establishing the institute will be reviewed along with outcomes and suggested changes. The differences in managing a joint venture heart institute versus a typical hospital-based heart center will be discussed and organizational structure examined. Examples of marketing strategies and strategic business development approaches will be presented, including the creation of a 28-site clinic system.

    3:10 – 4:10pmBreak/Exhibits

    (Garden Court)

    4:10 – 5:10pm

    Upcoming Regulatory and Legal Changes

    Wayne Powell,

    Director of Regulatory & Legal Affairs, Advocacy Division, American College of Cardiology, Bethesda, Maryland

    ü

    Medicare Fee Changes – numerous changes will continue to stir the Medicare Fee Schedule, all work values will be re-evaluated by 2002, practice expense payments are being revised, and the formula for setting the conversion factor being reconsidered by Congress. Learn about likely outcome of these changes.

    ü

    New Medicare Coverage Process – HCFA is again trying to develop a better and more centralized process for making coverage decisions. Learn how this change will affect new cardiovascular procedures.

    ü

    Medicare Managed Care – the government continues to encourage Medicare beneficiaries into Managed Care programs even though these programs are not saving the government any money (yet). See what changes are in the offering.

    ü

    Fraud & Abuse – Many in Washington think that the healthcare system is wrought with fraud and abuse. They are sending armies of investigators to stop it. Find out when the onslaught will hit your hometown (or office).

    Cardiology

    Economics & Regulation of CV Medicine(Ballroom III)

    1:00 – 2:00pm

    The Physician Executive as a Catalyst and Advocate in the Economic Reform of Cardiovascular Medicine

    Paul D. Walter, MD

    , FACC, President/Chief Executive Officer, Cardiology Associates of Lubbock, Texas

    This presentation will discuss:

    ü

    Aspects of leadership in building consensus

    ü

    Merging business applications with clinical issues

    ü

    Alliance-building with providers, industry, patients and payors

    ü

    Proactive advocacy

    2:10 – 3:10pm

    Costs and Effectiveness of Diagnostic Testing and Therapeutic Intervention in Cardiology

    Sponsored by DuPont Pharmaceutical Company

    Leslee J. Shaw, PhD

    , Associate Professor & Associate Director of Cardiovascular Health Services Research, Center for Clinical Evaluation Sciences, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia

    This presentation will discuss:

    • The supportive rationale for performing clinical and economic outcome evaluations
    • The methods of economic evaluations
    • The current data on cost implications of PTCA and CABG use

    3:10 – 4:10pmBreak/Exhibits

    (Garden Court)

    4:10 – 5:10pm

    Healthcare 2000: The Washington Perspective

    Ann M. Gosier

    , Vice President, Government Affairs, Guidant Corporation,

    Public policies help shape the environment in which we operate and define how hospitals do business. Today the legislative and executive branches of our government are redefining HCFA processes and proposing new payment policies, considering far reaching changes to the Medicare system, debating a patients’ bill of rights, examining alternative healthcare delivery systems, and reviewing existing policies governing records confidentiality and the conduct of clinical trials. The status of legislative and regulatory initiatives affecting our operations will be examined and trends in healthcare will be discussed.

    Oncology

    (Ballroom IV)

    1:00 – 2:00pm

    Alternative/Complimentary Medicine

    John L. Surprenant

    , Executive Director, Oncology Services, St. John Health System, Detroit, Michigan

    This workshop will provide an overview of promising complementary/alternative methods currently being used with traditional oncology care. The session will review current CAM research relevant to oncology; strategies for helping cancer patients assess integrative modalities; and examine trends in the field of integrative medicine and cancer. At the conclusion of this presentation, participants should be able to:

    ü

    Identify trends in the field of complementary and alternative medicine in cancer care

    ü

    Identify various CAM prevention and treatment therapies used by cancer patients

    ü

    List current CAM research in the field of oncology

    ü

    Describe a strategy that could be used to assist patients in assessing integrative modalities

    2:10 – 3:10pm

    Assessing the Financial Impact of Ambulatory Payment Classifications (APCs) on Medical Oncology Services

    Joel Yuhas

    , ELM Services, Inc., Rockville, Maryland

    ü

    The mechanics of APCs: How reimbursements are bundled and what codes are grouped together

    ü

    The mathematics of APCs: How is may work

    ü

    The effors of APC theory and unanswered questions: What’s missing, yet to be defined, and why are these issues important for the financial position of medical oncology services

    ü

    A sample case-study will be presented assessing projected revenue under APCs

    3:10 – 4:10pmBreak/ Exhibits

    (Garden Court)

    4:10 – 5:10pm

    Sleeping with the Enemy: Developing Community Partnerships

    Marsha Fountain, RN, MSN

    , Vice President, Health Care Planning

    Marc Gelinas, MHA

    , Healthcare Consultant, The Stichler Group, Inc., Arlington, Texas

    This presentation will present potential areas for collaboration, common pitfalls (turf wars, organization, control of dollars), alternative organizational models, success factors, who to involve, and the steps that can be taken to create a collaborative community partnerships. The speakers will use two case studies as examples including strategic planning for partnership, development of a community model, and key success factors.

    Oncology

    (Galleria)

    1:00 – 2:00pm

    Financial Feasibility Analyses: A Practical Guide for Cancer Program Executives

    Joseph M. Spallina, FAAMA, FACHE

    , Director, Arvina Group, LLC, Ann Arbor, Michigan

    This session will review:

    • A detailed discussion of the key activities and process components in the financial feasibility analysis process
    • How key activities such as market, regulatory, legal, and financial feasibility should be approached
    • A template for assessing the financial feasibility of key cancer services such as radiation therapy, B&MT/Stem cell, and outreach (physician practice and outpatient nursing services/infusion therapy.)

    2:10 – 3:10pm

    What’s Up Doc? – The Role of the Medical Director…Past, Present, & Future

    Marie DeStefano

    , Administrative Director, Crozer Keystone Health System, Drexel Hills, Pennsylvania

    Susan A. Higman

    , Vice President, Managed Care/Network Development, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Rockledge Pike, Pennsylvania

    This presentation will focus on addressing the following issues related to Cancer Program Medical Leadership:

    ü

    Provide an overview of the different structures for medical leadership models comparing academic to community settings, full time versus part time

    ü

    Discuss responsibilities/accountabilities of the medical director/chairperson for cancer program alliances

    ü

    Identify time commitment/salary and candidate selection issues related to position

    ü

    Describe reporting structure for the oncology executive committee within a comprehensive cancer program

    3:10 – 4:10pmBreak/Exhibits

    (Garden Court)

    4:10 – 5:10pm

    Customer Service Strategies: Benchmarking Against the Best

    Joana Adams, RN, BS

    , Director of Marketing, Angel Williamson’s Women”s Health Center, Pensacola, Florida

    Deborah Bostic, RN, MSN

    , Chief Nursing Officer, Santa Rosa Medical Center, Milton, Florida

    Particiapants will learn how to:

    ü

    Create a new customer service culture for their organization

    ü

    Design an employee reward and recognition program that brings results

    ü

    Shift market share with a performance-based customer service platform

    5:30-6:00pm Processional Formation

    (Habersham Corridor)

    6:00-7:30pm Convocation Ceremony

    (Habersham)

    Keynote Presentation – Thomas R. Reardon, MD, President, American Medical Association, Boring, Oregon

    7:30-10:00pm Chairman’s Reception

    (Ballroom III, IV & Corridor)sponsored by Bristol-Myers Squibb Company

    Saturday, November 6, 1999

    7:00 – 8:30am State & Regional Directors’ Breakfast Meeting

    (Ascot)

    7:30 – 12:00pm Registration & Hospitality

    (Registration A&B)

    7:30am Continental Breakfast

    (Garden Court)

    7:30 – 11:00am Exhibits

    (Garden Court)

     Information Systems

    (Wilton)

    8:00-9:00am

    Another Healthcare Mandate: Internet Technology!

    Paul Reich, MD

    , Chief Medical Officer, Scheur Management Group,

    In the evolution and revolution of healthcare with increasing competition/mergers and acquisitions, use of the Internet is symbolic of the “ultimate” provider network. It is essential for healthcare organizations to become “Internet Enabled” as this allows for a cost-effective tool for building provider relationships, recruitment, information and resources, exchange of referrals, performing or having access to population-based disease management, performing member eligibility, credentialing, and medical management functions, sending information, and receiving policy and regulatory guidelines.

    9:10-10:10am

    Building the Electronic World of Healthcare

    Cynthia P. Danaher

    , Vice President & General Manager, Hewlett-Packard Medical Products Group, Andover, Massachusetts

    Over the past several decades, we have been evolving steadily toward a world in which access to information technology is pervasive almost everywhere we go – out homes, businesses, banks, hospitals, and schools. We are rapidly entering the era of the Electronic World, expanding the possibilities of how healthcare is delivered, giving consumers the power to make informed decisions about their own care, and offering new efficiencies in sales, marketing and purchasing. In this presentation, Ms. Danaher addresses three aspects of this new electronic world – E-business, E-consumer, and E-commerce – and the dramatic role this brave new world will play in healthcare.

    10:10-11:10amBreak/Exhibits

    (Garden Court)

    11:10–12:10pm

    Harnessing the Power of the Internet

    Dan Proctor

    , Chief Technology Officer, Passport Health Communications

    T

    The Internet infrastructure

    • Driving forces
    • Information technology trends
    • Internet solutions for the healthcare industry
    • The future of the Internet

    Managed Care

    (Chancellor)

    8:00-9:00am

    The Marriage of Rehabilitation and Fitness…Why it Works

    Laurie B. Bajich, PT

    , Administrator/Chief Executive Officer, Health South Rehabilitation Hospital of Austin, Texas

    At a time when reimbursement is spiraling downward, wellness programs are springing up everywhere. Capitated contracts incentivize healthcare providers to implement preventative programs in an effort to keep people healthy. But, how is it done successfully? This presentation will describe how traditional rehabilitation has not been effective in keeping people out of the health care system. The strategies and aspects of a successful rehabilitation/fitness approach to healthcare will be outlined and case studies will be utilized to illustrate the efficacy and efficiency of this model of care.

    9:10-10:10am

    From Baby-

    Boom to Geri-Boom – Focus on Healthcare Demand and Delivery

    Maj James Wooten, USAF, MSC, CFAAMA

    , Chief, Medical Services Scholarships, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio

    This talk focuses on the impact of the Baby-Boomers on healthcare delivery and usage in the United States, with a few side-trips to remind the audience of the history that the Baby-Boomers have made and are still making. Starting with a demographic overview of the Baby-Boom, and infusing facts and figures on the impact of the Boomers on healthcare and the world in general, it will lead to a look into the possible impacts in healthcare that will occur as the Baby-Boom evolves into the Geri-Boom – starting less than twelve years from now! Information that may help you decide the direction for your organization to take in future ventures, which specialty to encourage offspring to go into for future prosperity, or simply help you make more informed stock picks while preparing for your own retirement!

    10:10-11:10amBreak/Exhibits (

    Garden Court)

    11:10-12:10pm

    Reengineering Primary Care in the Air Force Medical Service

    LtCol Douglas Anderson, CHE

    , Commander, 56thMedical Support Squadron, Luke Air Force Base, Arizona

    The presenter will discuss initiatives one Air Force Medical Center developed as it reshaped their primary care delivery system to meet the Department of Defenses’ implementation of the TRICARE program.

    Contingency Planning

    (Waverly)

     8:00-9:00am

    Bio-Terrorism: The History and Background; The Threat and How We Will Respond

    CDR Randy Culpepper, MC, USN

    , Deputy Director, Operational Medicine Division, The U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Ft. Detrick, Maryland

    As the Lead Agency and National Asset for countering the bio-warfare threat, the USAMRIID retains a unique perspective on the threat of the biological weapon of mass destruction. Dr. Culpepper’s presentation will trace the evolution of the weaponized pathogenic agent and discuss current response mechanisms to mitigate the effects of a biological exposure against a targeted population.

    9:10-10:10am

    Providing Examples of Preparedness at U.S. Hospitals to Cope with the WMD Environment

    Christi Koenig, MD

    , Chief Consultant, Emergency Management/Strategic Healthcare Group, Department of Veteran’s Affairs, Martinsburg, West Virginia

    This first of two briefs by the Department of VA will focus on hospital-based preparations to deal with the unique challenges posed by chemical and biological weapons.

    10:10-10:30amBreak/Exhibits

    (Garden Court)

    10:30-11:30am

    Interagency Coordination in International Crisis Mitigation and Recovery

    William H. Lyerly, Jr

    ., Emerging Threats and Crisis Response Group Leader, Office of Sustainable Development, Bureau for Africa, U.S. Agency for International Development, Riva, Maryland

    Interagency coordination and cooperation during a WMD associated emergency will be critical to ensure the optimization of support for an affected population. The requirement for multiple agency inter-reliance will be even greater during an international crisis related to a large-scale emergency event.

    11:40-12:40pm

    VA’s Partnership Role for WMD Consequence Management

    Robert Elliott

    , Deputy Director, Emergency Management/Strategic Healthcare Group, Department of Veteran’s Affairs, Martinsburg, West Virginia

    This presentation will focus on the broader role of the VA in their partnership role with the DoD, NDMS, and civilian healthcare support agencies in providing integrated training, direct pharmaceutical and antidotal support, and disaster emergency medical personnel for consequence management subsequent to a domestic WMD event.

    Cardiology

    Marketing CV Programs (Ballroom I)

     8:00 – 9:00am

    The Application of Positioning and Branding Strategies: Enhancing Reputation as a Heart Care Provider

    James Grothey

    , Senior Account Executive, BVK/McDonald, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

    This hands-on marketing workshop will offer tips and insight into cardiovascular programs with strong reputations and to those that are reputationally challenged. The workshop will focus on the following key areas of marketing:

    ü

    The importance of reputation to both symptomatic and asymptomatic consumers

    ü

    Tools to internally and externally assess program reputation, brand, and position versus competitors

    ü

    Fundamentals of developing or enhancing your brand as a heart care provider

    ü

    The role of various media in brand development

    ü

    Understanding and leveraging your connection to a parent company, whether it bo a for-profit corporation, hospital, or health system

    ü

    The importance of brand guardianship – consistency in brand portrayal over the long term

    The presentation of these concepts will rely heavily on case studies and participants will see a number of diverse creative executions of brand and position for heart programs.

    9:10 – 10:10amcontinued from above

    10:10 – 11:10amBreak/Exhibits

    (Garden Court)

    11:10 – 12:10pcontinued from above

    Cardiology

    Hospital/Physician/Vendor Alliances(Ballroom II)

    8:00 – 9:00am

    Hospital, Physician, Vendor Partnerships – A Strategy for Success

    R. Kyle Kramer

    , Administrative Director, Cardiovascular Services, PennState Geisinger Health System, Hershey, Pennsylvania

    Participants in this session will learn the key motivating factors of the respective parties involved in the delivery of healthcare services, key behavioral attributes, and how to move beyond traditional static isolation to the point of positive co-dependence.

    9:10 – 10:10am

    Hospital and Physician Economic Partnerships: The Value Share Modelä

    Joane H. Goodroe, FACCA

    , President, Goodroe & Company, Atlanta, Georgia

    In an era of dramatic decreasing revenue and increasing costs of technology, hospitals and physicians are faced with the challenges of continuing to deliver quality care to patients. Economic alignment between hospitals and physicians must occur for continued success of any cardiac program. The Value Share Model

    ä has been developed to allow hospitals to reward physicians for their time and effort to reduce hospital costs within their specialty. This program has been carefully constructed with attention to overall compliance with governmental regulations.

    10:10 – 11:10amBreak/Exhibits

    (Garden Court)

    11:10 – 12:10pm

    Hospitals, Physicians, Vendors, and Payors: New Millennium Requires a New Attitude

    Dennis Condon

    , Principal, Philips Healthcare Consulting, Shelton, Connecticut

    In order to be a successful cardiac care provider, one must be able to provide high quality, cost-effective CV disease management. It therefore is essential that an institution provide the highest quality data with effective and timely management and communication of information. If we agree that these are the minimum requirements, then why is it that we cannot even talk to each other? This session is designed to present the “market” from the perspective of each of the key players.

    Cardiology

    Staff Development & Utilization(Ballroom III)

    8:00 – 9:00am

    Promoting Competency in Cardiovascular Programs: Getting Back to the Basics

    Kevin J. McGovern,

    Clinical Operations Director, Cardiovascular Services, PennState Geisinger Health System, Hershey, Pennsylvania

    Participants will learn the fundamentals of competency program development including a review of the JCAHO standards for competency evaluation, the critical components of a successful competency program, and how to assess employee competency on an ongoing basis. Participants will also have the opportunity to review a successful competency program within an active cardiovascular program.

    9:10 – 10:10am

    Case Management: From Concept to Operation

    Polly H. Willis, RN, MSN

    , Director, Patient Care Management

    Laura Williams, RN, BSN, CCRN

    , Cardiac Surgery Case Manager, Saint Joseph’s Hospital of Atlanta, Georgia

    This session will describe the development and implementation of a service line based case management program which encompasses performance improvement, utilization management, case management and discharge planning. Strategies for the interdisciplinary development of care maps which transcend the continuum of care and incorporate patient teaching will also be discussed.

    10:10 – 11:10pmBreak/ Exhibits

    (Garden Court)

    11:10 – 12:10pm

    Current Operational Issues in Cardiovascular

    Programs – A Panel Discussion

    Moderator – Kevin J. Nowak, Lrd, Executive Director, Cardiovascular Services, Rochester General Hospital, Rochester, New York

    Panelists – Representatives of Cardiovascular Administrators from Programs Across the U.S.

    Oncology

    (Ballroom IV)

    8:00 – 9:00am

    Past, Present and Future of the Breast Care Center: The Englewood Model

    Miguel A. Sanchez, MD

    , Chief, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Englewood Hospital, Englewood, New Jersey

    Within the last ten years multidisciplinary breast care centers have sprung up around the country. Since 1991 the Cytodiagnosis and Breast Care Center at Englewood has provided a multi-disciplinary approach to the diagnosis and management planning of breast cancer. Since the insertion, the volume of patients has increased tenfold. The Center includes a group of cytopathologists and radiologists involved in the diagnostic end and prospective, multi-disciplinary management planning group composed of breast surgeons, oncologists, radiation therapists, plastic surgeons, genetic counselors, and psychosocial services. Same day diagnostic services and pre-operative management planning are corner stones in the functioning of the Englewood Center. Since the insertion, the model has been duplicated in many countries and many centers are now open in Europe using this model.

    9:10 – 10:10am

    Affiliations Between Community Cancer Programs and Academic/Tertiary Facilities

    Marsha Fountain, RN, MSN

    , Vice President, Health Care Planning

    Marc Gelanas, MHA

    , Healthcare Consultant, The Stichler Group, Inc., Arlington, Texas

    Ellen Tobin

    , Founder, Cancer Care Strategies, Chevy Chase, Maryland

    This presentation will present findings from a survey, interviews, and the presenters actual experience developing affiliations between community hospitals and academic/tertiary facilities. It will present types of affiliations, what each partner should expect, and how to negotiate a win/win affiliation.

    10:10 –11:10Break/Exhibits

    (Garden Court)

    11:10 – 12:10pm

    American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer: A Report from the ACOA Representative

    Teri U. Guidi

    , Senior Associate, ELM Services, Inc. Rockville, Maryland

    This session will provide attendees with the opportunity to hear from the ACOA’s liaison representative and to participate in an audience-driven conversation to address the pressing, real-world concerns of shepherding your program through the Approvals process.

    ü

    What’s new for the Committee on Approvals – a summary of the Committee’s efforts to address program needs

    ü

    Changes, updates, and trends from the Accreditation Standards – from the new Network category to the latest information on JCAHO reciprocity and outpatient case capture

    ü

    Interactive discussion of issues facing session participants – bring your questions on survey preparation and share your own tips to help colleagues survive

    Oncology

    (Kennesaw)

    8:00 – 9:00am

    The NCCN Model for Continuous Quality Improvement in Cancer Care:

    Implementation of NCCN Guidelines Through Performance Management

    William T. McGivney, PhD,

    Chief Executive Officer, National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Rockledge, Pennsylvania

    This presentation will discuss:

    ü

    An overview of evolving healthcare marketplace, response to National Cancer Policy Boardü Report, perspective on previous attempts in this area

    ü

    NCCN guidelines: their development, communication, and application

    ü

    Implementation of NCCN guidelines through performance measurement in the NCCN Oncology Outcomes Database

    ü

    Extension of guidelines to pricing model and patient information

    ü

    Partnerships with managed care in CQI

    9:10 – 10:10am

    So, I Have All This Data…Now What? Integrating Financial and Clinical Data to Impact Outcomes

    Patricia H. Stanfill, RN, MS, MBA

    , National Oncology Service Line Director, Columbia/HCA Healthcare Corporation, Nashville, Tennessee

    Upon completion of this session, participants will be able to:

    • Identify opportunities for outcome improvement from clinical and financial database
    • Integrate financial and clinical data to benchmark current performance
    • Model financial and clinical indicators to shape quality enhancement leading to improved outcomes
    • Present evidence-based outcomes to validate quality in a program

    10:10-11:10amBreak/Exhibits

    (Garden Court)

    11:10 – 12:10pm

    Adopting the Breast Center Model to Other Specialties

    Brian E. McCagh

    , Executive Director, Washington Cancer Institute at Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC

    Adopting the breast cancer center model to other cancer sites is becoming increasingly popular among cancer programs, providers, and patients. More cancer programs are finding this approach to reintegrating the cancer care continuum results in greater patient and provider satisfaction, while raising the quality of care across the continuum. This presentation will discuss:

    ü

    Driving forces of reintegration

    ü

    Interdisciplinary team approach

    ü

    Site-specific center organization and operation

    ü

    Patient care guidelines

    ü

    Promotion and growth in patient volumes

    1:00-4:00pm-Post Conference

    (Tyndall)

    Using the Balanced Scorecard in Healthcare Organizations

    Donna Foth-Collins

    , Principal Consultant, Accelerated Business Strategies, Renton, Washington

    The Balanced Scorecard. It’s a hot topic these days – in book, in journals and in healthcare organizations. Why? Seasoned executives do not want to choose between financial and operational measures. These executives want a balanced presentation of measures that allows them to view the company from several perspectives simultaneously. Leading healthcare organizations are successfully implementing the Balanced Scorecard strategic management system. The results have been astounding and have left little doubt that, starting now, the Balanced Scorecard will become a standard management practice in healthcare organizations. This post-conference provides a major opportunity for healthcare executives to see how other organizations have successfully implemented the Balanced Scorecard, learn how to implement the Scorecard in their own organizations, or to improve the development of their own Scorecard. The real beauty of the Balanced Scorecard is that it links vision, strategy formulation and performance measurements. The Balanced Scorecard is a process, or a step-by-step approach for defining and interrelating strategy-related measurements. In essence, the Balanced Scorecard is a system to manage strategy implementation. All it takes is six things:

    ü

    Mobilization of a cross-functional team to launch the Balanced Scorecard performance measurement system

    ü

    Confidence in, and commitment to, your organization’s executives to develop the appropriate measures

    ü

    Training in measurement definition and data requirements

    ü

    Development of an information architecture to capture the required data and convert it into performance information

    ü

    The Alignment of incentives to the Balanced Scorecard

    ü

    Dedication to continuous fine-tuning and improvement of your Balanced Scorecard measurement system

    The Balanced Scorecard methodology is conceptually simple. Yet what seems to simple in the telling can be tough as nails to execute.